Curry Peanut Zoodles with Tofu and Bok Choy

Zucchini noodles

Zucchini noodles (aka “zoodles”) are probably one of my favorite light summer dinners.  They are so versatile, healthy, and low-carb.  They are great tossed with marinara or pesto instead of traditional pasta, or you can make more of a cold salad dish with them and a roasted red pepper vinaigrette.

Zoodles are an essential part of our meal rotation  right now because we are drowning in zucchini from my garden. Like 3 zucchini per person per day drowning.  My 2 zucchini plants from Springdale Farms are absolutely killing it right now and making me give away zucchini to all of my family, neighbors, and co-workers.  I’ve become pretty popular in the office as the weird produce lady who will bring you ingredients for your dinner…

This recipe is a variation of some kind of Asian zoodle bowl that I eat about once a week.  There are a few steps, and it may look like a lot of ingredients, but the sauce can be made in advance or substituted with a bottled coconut curry sauce of your choosing.

Curry Peanut Zoodles with Tofu and Bok Choy
serves 2 or 3

2 medium zucchini, spiralized or cut into very thing strips

For the Tofu:
1 lb of extra firm tofu
2 tbs of soy sauce
1 tsp of siracha
2 tsp of curry powder
1 tsp garlic powder
1/2 tsp ginger powder
1 tbs canola oil

For the Curry Peanut Sauce (from Isa Does It)
2 tsp olive oil
1 tbs minced fresh ginger, or 1 tsp of ginger powder
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 cup water
1/2 cup smooth peanut butter
2 tsp mild Indian curry powder
2 tbs rice vinegar
2 tbs tamari
2 tbs agave nectar
1 tsp sriracha

For the Bok Choy:
2 or 3 heads of baby bok choy, broken up into spears
1 tbs olive oil
dash of garlic powder and salt

First, prep the tofu.  Cut the tofu into 1 inch thick pieces and wrap thickly in paper towels.  Place several heavy cutting boards/books/pans on the tofu to press the water out for at least 30 minutes.  Then cut the tofu in cubes and toss with the rest of the tofu ingredients except for the canola oil.  Let sit for 5 minutes to absorb the flavors.

In the meantime, preheat the oven to 375.  Toss the bok choy with olive oil, garlic powder, and salt, and arrange on a heavy baking sheet.  Set aside while finishing the next step for the tofu.

Heat a frying pan with the canola oil over medium heat.  Add the tofu and sauté  for 5 minutes or until browned on all sides.  Add to the baking sheet with the bok choy and bake for 15 minutes.

While the tofu and bok choy and are baking, make the curry sauce.

In a high wall frying pan or large sauce pan, add the olive oil and preheat over medium-low heat. Then, sauté the ginger and garlic in the oil for about 30 seconds.  Add the water to deglaze the pan, then turn up the heat to medium heat. Once the water is warm, add the peanut butter, curry powder, rice vinegar, tamari, agave, and sriracha. Continue to gently stir the sauce until the ingredients are well mixed and the sauce is smooth.  Taste and adjust the curry or sriracha to taste.

To assemble the dish, put zoodles in a large bowl, top with sauce, tofu, bok choy, and diced green onions if desired.  The zoodles will soften a bit from the heat of the sauce.  If you prefer more cooked zoodles, microwave them for about 30 seconds before assembling the dish.

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